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  • Sex Male br Female br Charlson comorbidity score br

    2020-07-29

    Sex Male
    Female
    Charlson comorbidity score
    Calendar year of surgery <2009
    Tumor stage 0-II
    III-IV
    Rectal cancer
    Sex Male
    Female
    Charlson comorbidity score
    Calendar year of surgery <2009
    Tumor stage 0-II
    III-IV
    a Adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, calendar year of surgery and tumor stage.
    hospitals due to fewer operating surgeons, compared to larger hospitals. This could explain some of the heterogeneity in results between studies examining hospital volume and long-term sur-vival. Also, high-volume surgeons might have performed surgery at low-volume hospitals from time to time, which could attenuate associations between hospital volume and long-term prognosis. Differences in results between studies might also be due to differ-ences in methodology, cut-offs for hospital volume, populations, and healthcare systems.
    In conclusion, this Imatinib (STI571) nationwide and population-based cohort study of all gastrointestinal cancer locations found decreased disease-specific and all-cause 5-year mortality after higher volume surgery for patients with cancer of the colon, particularly in pa-tients of older age, more comorbidity, and advanced tumor stage, and possibly also in groups of patients with cancer of the esoph-agus, pancreas, or rectum. No such prognostic benefits were found for patients with cancer of the stomach, liver, bile ducts, or small bowel. However, these result need to be interpretated with caution, as the power for tumours other than colon was limited.
    Conflicts of interest
    No conflicts of interest to declare.
    Acknowledgements
    The study was funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Swedish Cancer Society and the United European Gastroenterology Research Prize, Austria.
    Appendix A. Supplementary data
    References
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    Please cite this article as: Gottlieb-Vedi E et al., Annual hospital volume of surgery for gastrointestinal cancer in relation to prognosis, European Journal of Surgical Oncology, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2019.03.016
    8 E. Gottlieb-Vedi et al. / European Journal of Surgical Oncology xxx (xxxx) xxx
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