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  • Habr Gama A Perez RO

    2020-08-12

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    Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
    Applied Radiation and Isotopes
    journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/apradiso
    Assessment of the radiation absorbed dose produced by 177Lu-iPSMA, 225Ac- T iPSMA and 223RaCl2 to prostate cancer cell nuclei in a bone microenvironment model
    Erika Azorín-Vegaa,∗, Eva Rojas-Calderónb,∗∗, Guillermina Ferro-Floresa, Liliana Aranda-Larac, Nallely Jiménez-Mancillad, Miguel A. Nava-Cabreraa,c
    a Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac, 52750, Estado de México, Mexico
    b Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac, 52750, Estado de México, Mexico
    c Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Toluca, 50180, Mexico
    d CONACyT, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ocoyoacac, 52750, Estado de México, Mexico
    • 225Ac-iPSMA produces doses to prostate cancer cells almost 3 orders of magnitude greater than 177Lu-iPSMA.
    • 225Ac-iPSMA produces doses to prostate cancer cells in bone metastases 14 times greater than 223RaCl2.
    • 225Ac-iPSMA could the best option for treatment of bone metastases in prostate cancer.
    Keywords:
    Theranostic radiopharmaceuticals
    PSMA inhibitors
    Prostate cancer 
    This research aimed to assess the radiation absorbed dose produced by 177Lu-iPSMA (177Lu-prostate specific membrane antigen inhibitor), 225Ac-iPSMA and 223RaCl2 to prostate cancer cell nuclei in a simplified model of bone by using an experimental in-vitro prostate cancer LNCaP cell biokinetic study and Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNPX code. Results showed that 225Ac-iPSMA releases a nine hundred-fold radiation dose greater than 177Lu-iPSMA and 14 times more than 223RaCl2 per unit of activity retained in bone. 225Ac-iPSMA could be the best option for treatment of bone metastases in prostate cancer.
    1. Introduction
    Bone metastases in the advanced stages of prostate cancer (PCa) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Targeted radionuclide therapy is currently being used as a treatment option for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (Heck et al., 2018; Hofman et al., 2018; Kratochwil et al., 2018; Santos-Cuevas et al., 2018).